History

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Head of Faculty

Subject Leader

Vision

To promote the discovery of the global interconnection and parallel nature of history to develop an understanding of the narrative of human history and how this is reflected in the world today. We aim to ignite a lifelong passion for the study of history through challenging and diverse histories spanning from the history of the British Isles and across the world. We want students to acquire an understanding of the events which have shaped the world in which they will inherit in order to flourish in an ever-changing world. 

Disciplinary Concepts

  • Cause and consequence
  • Change and continuity
  • Similarity and difference
  • Significance
  • Evidence
  • Interpretations

Big Questions

  • What is history?
  • Why do empires rise and fall?
  • What wins wars?
  • What makes a great leader?
  • How do spiritual movements spread?
  • What causes nationalism?
  • How do intellectual movements start?
  • What impact does technology have on social change?

Curriculum Content

Key Stage 3

Year 7 Program of Study:

The Battle of Hastings ascertaining the contenders to the throne, events of the battle and consequences. Medieval Kings including William’s control of England (castles and feudal system), King John, Crusades, the Black Death and Peasants’ Revolt.  The Hundred Years War – Breadth Study which explores the role of Medieval women in politics, the development of international conflict and the development of life, culture and society. The unit also includes The War of the Roses and the challengers of the throne, development of international influence, the Princes in the Tower. Tudor England investigating the establishment of the Tudor dynasty, the lives and impacts of Henry VIII and Edward VI, interpretations of Mary I, Philip of Spain, Elizabeth and the events of the Armada. The English Civil War considering the causes, events and consequences of the downfall of the English Monarchy and the rise of Oliver Cromwell.

Year 8 Program of Study:

The French Revolution examining the causes, events and consequences of the French Revolution both domestically and internationally.  The Industrial Revolution - Charting the social, political and economic changes of the Victorian era. Empires exploring concepts of change and continuity through Medieval Africa, African Empires, case study of the Kongo, impacts of the British Empire and abolition of slavery. Russia in Revolution investigating the changing nature of power and authority through the causes and events of the October revolution, growth of communism, rise of Stalin. World War One discovering the causes and events of key turning points in the war, investigating soldiers’ experiences of war and introducing historical interpretations. In the Shadow of Versailles tracking the political, social, economic and cultural landscape of Europe following the Treaty of Versailles and its consequences for the wider world.

Year 9 Program of Study:

World War II: exploring the causes, events, consequences and human cost of the Second World War. The Holocaust (Statutory Requirement) investigating the causes, events and consequences of the Holocaust in its historical context. The Arab-Israeli Conflict, allowing students to develop an understanding of the creation of Israel, the causes, events and consequences of the Arab-Israeli conflict and its impact on the wider world.  20th Century America - breadth case study which explores the social, political, economic and cultural changes in America across the 20th Century. 20th Century China considering the changing nature of governance in China, the Cultural Revolution and China’s place in the modern world.

Key Stage 4: Edexcel GCSE History (Paper Codes 11, 2Q, 31)

Paper 1: Medicine in Britain, c1250-present – Thematic Study. Comprised of the following units of study:

Medieval Medicine 1250 – 1500,
Renaissance Medicine 1500-1700,
Industrial Medicine 1700 – 1900,
Modern Medicine 1900 – Present
Medicine on the Western Front – Historic Environment Study.

Paper 2: Henry VIII and his ministers – British Depth Study. Comprise of the following units of study:

The Rise and Fall of Wolsey,
The Rise and Fall of Cromwell,
Religious Reform and Opposition.

Paper 2: Superpower Relations and The Cold War – Period Study. Comprised of the following units of study:

Origins of the Cold War,
Events of the Cold War,
End of the Cold War.

Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany– Modern Depth Study.  Comprised of the following units of study:

The Weimar Republic,
The Rise of the Nazis,
Dictatorship in Nazi Germany,
Life in Nazi Germany.

Key Stage 5: Edexcel A Level History (Route G: Nationalism, dictatorship and democracy in twentieth-century Europe with Option 31)

Germany and West Germany: 1919-1991 (Paper 1) – Breadth Study with Interpretations.

The Rise and Fall of Fascism in Italy (Paper 2) – Depth Study

Independent Research Enquiry (Non- Examined Assessment) – Coursework

Rebellion and Disorder Under the Tudors, 1485-1603 (Paper 3) – Themes in Breadth with aspects of Depth

Key Stage Three History Assessment Descriptors:

Grade Descriptor
Below The student shows their emerging knowledge and understanding of the past by recognising the distinction between present and past, by placing a few events and objects in order, by using common words and phrases about the passing of time and by recounting episodes from stories about the past. The student attempts to recall the core content knowledge often scoring below 25% accuracy in the knowledge section of their assessment. The student provides a basic response in their extended writing which omits a line of argument and factual accuracy. The student can demonstrate an awareness of some features of the subject specific skills listed above.
Working Towards The student shows their increasing knowledge and understanding of the past by using dates and terms, by describing some of the main events, people and periods they have studied and by placing them into different periods of time. They begin to recognise some of the similarities and differences between these periods and are beginning to suggest causes and consequences of the main events and changes. They identify some of the different ways in which the past has been represented. They use sources to find answers to questions about the past. The student can recall some aspects of the core content knowledge, scoring over between 25-49% accuracy in the knowledge section of their end of unit assessment. The student can construct a response which attempts to include a line of argument in their extended writing, although this can be implicit in parts. They can demonstrate an understanding of some features of the subject specific skills listed above and are able to utilise some evidence of these skills in their assessed work.  
Meeting  The student shows their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by describing events, people and some features of past societies and periods in the context of their developing chronological framework. They begin to recognise and describe the nature and extent of diversity, change and continuity, and to suggest relationships between causes. They suggest some reasons for different interpretations of the past and they begin to recognise why some events, people and changes might be judged as more historically significant than others. They investigate historical problems and issues and begin to ask their own questions. They begin to evaluate sources to establish evidence for particular enquiries. They select and deploy information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to support and structure their work. The student can display a sound grasp of the content knowledge often achieving 50% in the knowledge section of their end of unit assessment. The student can construct a line of argument and is able to communicate this with a degree of fluency in their writing, although the application of an argument can be inconsistent in longer responses. They demonstrate confidence in the application of a range of the skills listed above, however this is not consistent across all subject specific skills and can require prompting to go beyond access points provided. 
Working Above The student shows their knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history by analysing historical change and continuity, diversity and causation. They explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen or been constructed. They begin to explain how the significance of events, people and changes has varied according to different perspectives. They investigate historical problems and issues, asking and refining their own questions and beginning to reflect on the process undertaken. When establishing the evidence for a particular enquiry, pupils consider critically issues surrounding the origin, nature and purpose of sources. They select, organise and use relevant information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce well-structured work. The student can display a very good understanding of the content knowledge, often achieving around 75% accuracy in the knowledge section of their end of unit assessment. The student demonstrates the ability to formulate a line of argument which is consistently applied throughout written responses; however, this can lack depth and precision in places. They can effectively demonstrate the use almost all specific historical concepts taught within the unit of work and demonstrate competent application of the subject specific skills listed above in their assessed work where required. 
Exceeding  The student shows a confident and extensive knowledge and understanding of local, national and international history. They use this to frame and pursue enquiries about historical change and continuity, diversity and causation, constructing well-substantiated, analytic arguments within a wide frame of historical reference. They analyse links between events and developments that took place in different countries and in different periods. When exploring historical interpretations and judgements about significance, pupils construct convincing and substantiated arguments and evaluations based on their understanding of the historical context. They evaluate critically a wide range of sources, reaching substantiated conclusions independently. They use historical terminology confidently, reflectively and critically. They consistently produce precise and coherent narratives, descriptions and explanations. The student can display outstanding specific and accurate content knowledge in the knowledge section of their end of unit assessment, often achieving full marks. The student can construct a solid line of argument and write with fluency and conviction. They can demonstrate sound understanding of specific historical concepts taught within the unit of work and deploy subject specific skills listed above with precision in their assessed work where necessary.